Five Phases to Greatness:

Roig Rage Fitness implements customized workout regimens in line with the National Academy of Sports Medicine. These fitness regimens include 1) Stabilization Endurance, 2) Strength Endurance, 3) Hypertrophy,  4) Maximal Strength and 5) Power.

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  1. Stabilization Endurance – The first phase focuses on stabilizing the body and muscles to prevent injury and to prepare you for physical exercise.
  2. Strength Endurance – The second phase moves onto stabilization maintenance while increasing weight in super set form.
  3. Hypertrophy – The third phase is designed to help with maximal muscle growth.
  4. Maximal Strength – The fourth phase works toward your goal of maxing out your weight while lifting heavy loads.
  5. Power – The final and fifth phase emphasizes the development of speed and power in super set form.

As an athlete, how do you get better?

Baseball/Softball 
Designing a year round regiment for a team or individual for baseball specific movements is crucial in the overall performance of the athlete. In order to enhance batting power, speed, agilities, range of motion, flexibility, and conditioning, a thorough understanding and analysis must be made of team and individual deficits.

Baseball has traditionally been considered a fitness sport, but it also requires a certain amount of power. Swinging a bat, stealing a base, and throwing a ball require tremendous strength. However, many baseball conditioning programs do not emphasize power movements adequately. Strength training is significant because it establishes a base for power and endurance before the start of any sport-specific program.

Basketball   
Until recently, basketball coaches have been reluctant to require players to engage in strength/weight training programs during the three seasons: pre-season, in-season, and post-season. The primary reason was that larger and stronger muscles were feared to have an adverse effect on shooting accuracy. Today, many coaches require multi-seasonal strength training programs in conjunction with skill related activities. The consensus is that it improves team success, prevents injuries, and promotes aggressiveness.

Research shows that no training or reduced training programs lead to a period of de-training (1). De-training is a deconditioning process that affects performance because of diminished physiological capacity. However, research concluded that strength gains are typically maintained with minimal maintenance programs.

Boxing Team/Boxers  

Traditionalists claim that weight training tends to make a boxer muscle bound and fatigued. The muscle bound, non-flexible athlete is routinely not stretching adequately, not strength training properly through a full ROM, and not adhering to the relative muscle balance principle. It is imperative that a boxer devotes significant time and intensity to proper conditioning skill development. Strength training simply completes the athlete’s physical preparation.  

Noting the benefits of strength training (decreased injury potential and anaerobic capacity, muscular endurance, improve body composition, flexibility, contraction speed, force and power), claims that the boxer becomes slow and tired due to muscle developed as of strength training is obviously untrue. A strength-training program that is properly developed improves performance and decreases injury potential. It must be incorporated into the training programs of the novice as well as future World Champions.

Cross Country/Distance Runners
Cross-country running is a demanding sport. Unlike track, the athlete must be prepared to adapt to a wide range of terrains while competing in a race. Steep uphills, sharp downhills, uneven footing, hurdling various barriers and adjusting to speed changes such as tight turns or long straightaway’s are just some examples of the challenges faced in cross-country running.

These conditions warrant a well-rounded training program in the areas of aerobic, anaerobic, and muscular strength endurance. Muscular strength endurance is a vital point of training the cross-country athlete and one which is often overlooked or less emphasized in a training program.

Football
When planning a pre-season, in-season, or post-season program the following factors are emphasized:

1. Agility    

2. Coordination

3. Flexibility

4. Power

5. Reaction

6. Speed

7. Strength

8. Conditioning

Although my regiment is intense, it focuses on improvement in every area through a well-developed and team specific program designed to benefit each position. Coaches are kept abreast of gains in strength, speed, agility, quickness, and conditioning levels of athletes with pre-season, in-season, and post-season testing measures. Each athlete’s progress is charted and updated on a weekly basis to establish and maintain levels for peak performances. This also provides coaches with additional tools necessary to evaluate the capabilities of his team when preparing the depth chart and making game time match-up decisions.

Golf    

The mechanics of the golf swing has been identified by the medical community as a possible cause of a variety of injuries, including injury to vulnerable areas in the lower back. Many golfers continue to play the sport without a proper warm-up routine and are in poor physical condition, thus increasing the risk for injury to the lower back.  

In order to drastically reduce these risks, it is crucial that golfers become informed of the physical demands being placed on the body. Education is critical in the prevention of golf injuries, and should begin when one is initially introduced to the sport. It is the responsibility of the strength and conditioning coach to assist in this process by ensuring each client has a sound grasp of the mechanics of the golf swing and the vulnerable areas of the body prone to injury.

Soccer

Designing year round programs to optimize athletic performance though power training. Olympic-style lifts, squatting movements, and plyometrics train explosive-reactive mechanisms that are vital for the success of a soccer athlete.

This type of training becomes comprehensive when starting with a physical profile of each player. This establishes a baseline before training. Performing a variety of engaging exercises allows for a transfer of strength and power gains onto the soccer field. I place particular emphasis on the “power zone.” Players and coaches are convinced that training in this area in an explosive manner has brought them to the peak of their game.

When proper training is utilized both on and off the field, the result is a stronger, more powerful, and physically equipped athlete. A continuous high intensity training program of a cyclical nature will help soccer athletes win championships.

 I will train you with explosive maneuvers, while developing speed, quickness, and power in your game.  

Tennis    

Speed, agility, and quickness are components for the tennis athlete to develop. Tennis is primarily an anaerobic sport because it uses the phosphagen and lactic acid system together about 75% of the time.

A tennis player runs an average of 3 meters per shot and a total of 8 to 12 meters in the pursuit of 1 point. Tennis players who are not agile will have difficulty reaching well-placed shots. Tennis movements can be broken down into 3 directions: forward, which occurs 47% of the time; laterally, which occurs 48% of the time; and backward, which occurs 5% of the time.

As the strength and conditioning coach for you or your team, my training emphasis will focus on improving athletic fitness by incorporating sport-specific drills into the workout. Prior to any drill work, a warm-up that includes sport-specific dynamic flexibility movements will be integrated into your program.

Track & Field

Many weight training programs are geared toward the development of overall strength and power. Once this has been established, it is important to carry developmental gains to the next level in order to ensure the athlete that extra edge in performance. This where event specific exercises come into play. These exercises help enhance specific muscles and joint movements that directly result in successful outcomes.

My program is design to peak the athlete for the conference and national championships at the end of the season. All training that employs this program is power events requiring explosive movements. I am a thorough believer in the concept of speed specificity training; my programs are design for you to work towards that goal.

Volleyball

The major objective of the strength and conditioning program is injury prevention. In high-level volleyball athletes, the techniques of the game force the deltoid muscles to work under profound constraints. These muscles need to be strong to ensure their firmness. When meeting this condition, not only will performance be improved, but also the quantity and severity of injuries may be reduced. Modifying injury risk is a priority since a volleyball player injured through training errors will be unable to continue training effectively, to the ultimate disadvantage of competitive performance. Because of the long-range effects on performance over a season and even an entire career, the alteration of injury risk is fundamental in my program.

Strength and conditioning can be integrated into the regular training schedule at any time in the season. For instance, it can be used on a customary basis throughout the training year or it can be specifically introduced for the preparation of particularly important or difficult matches in a championship. During the competition season, however, both coaches and the players need to take into account the time need to recover from fatigue it generates when adding it to the general training program.